Fireball DXing

Propagation questions, answers and general information
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John Faulkner, Skegness
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Fireball DXing

Post by John Faulkner, Skegness »

Just a random thought I had this morning.

I wonder what it would be like listening to a meteor burst from a fireball. The chances of catching one must be so slim. I've seen a couple over the years. My guess is that the signals would be reminiscent of Italian soup. Strong too. Has anybody knowingly caught one and noticed the effects on FM?

The American Meteor Society document them here: https://www.amsmeteors.org/fireballs/fireball-report/

pe1etr
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Re: Fireball DXing

Post by pe1etr »

John Faulkner, Skegness wrote:
09 Jun 2020 10:31
Just a random thought I had this morning.

I wonder what it would be like listening to a meteor burst from a fireball. The chances of catching one must be so slim. I've seen a couple over the years. My guess is that the signals would be reminiscent of Italian soup. Strong too. Has anybody knowingly caught one and noticed the effects on FM?

The American Meteor Society document them here: https://www.amsmeteors.org/fireballs/fireball-report/
Strange as it may seem, fireballs don't give meteor scatter, they move too slowly. (in relative terms of course)

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iberiadx
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Re: Fireball DXing

Post by iberiadx »

Strange as it may seem, fireballs don't give meteor scatter, they move too slowly. (in relative terms of course)
Then, how is possible airplane scatter to happen? A flying plane is even slower than a fireball, isn't it?
¡Buen DX!
Jorge Garzón. EB7EFA / EA1036 SWL
IN83ag Cantabria (Spain) / 43°15'N • 3°56'W
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Rx: RSP1A/AirSpy HF+/Lowe HF 150/Sony SA3-ES-EE
Ant.: Fanfare FM-2G/Wellbrook 1530LN/5el SKT Yagi
Blog: http://iberiadx.wordpress.com

pe1etr
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Re: Fireball DXing

Post by pe1etr »

jotagarzon wrote:
09 Jun 2020 22:06
Strange as it may seem, fireballs don't give meteor scatter, they move too slowly. (in relative terms of course)
Then, how is possible airplane scatter to happen? A flying plane is even slower than a fireball, isn't it?
¡Buen DX!
Aeroplanes don't cause ionisation in the E layer of the ionosphere. They don't fly at 100 km high.

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iberiadx
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Re: Fireball DXing

Post by iberiadx »

Understood Peter!

So, maybe there is a minimum meteoroid speed to get the scatter effect?
Jorge Garzón. EB7EFA / EA1036 SWL
IN83ag Cantabria (Spain) / 43°15'N • 3°56'W
--
Rx: RSP1A/AirSpy HF+/Lowe HF 150/Sony SA3-ES-EE
Ant.: Fanfare FM-2G/Wellbrook 1530LN/5el SKT Yagi
Blog: http://iberiadx.wordpress.com

pe1etr
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Re: Fireball DXing

Post by pe1etr »

jotagarzon wrote:
10 Jun 2020 08:42
Understood Peter!

So, maybe there is a minimum meteoroid speed to get the scatter effect?
Yes, correct. Large meteoroids move as a slower speed due to increased friction.

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John Faulkner, Skegness
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Re: Fireball DXing

Post by John Faulkner, Skegness »

I find it hard to believe that a fireball won't produce scatter. A plane is simply a reflective metal object in the sky. I would imagine radio hams would be best placed to have experienced meteor scatter via a fireball. Maybe there is some documentation.

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